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likesmatureones 50M  
3857 posts
12/6/2018 4:37 am
Why is anyone still on facebook?


This honestly should be a rhetorical question...why does anyone still use this site.

The latest...indian scammer now use your fb info to target you.

A distraut young woman will call an elderly person in the us pretending to be their granddaughter...named...

Yep you gave them the info..say sally.

"Sally" now is in jail for a dui and despertly needs the grandparents to wire money for her bail.

That god people blog about every aspect of their lives and include all that juicy person info..

People get of the fb

likesmatureones 50M  
2698 posts
12/6/2018 4:37 am


maidofmilkxxx 68F  
50 posts
12/6/2018 6:14 am

I've been on Facebook for years and never got this scam. However ... I know many people have who have never been on Facebook, like the very elderly, and had this one. It's just like the one with the IRS calling you. Maybe your phone numbers get out there when you order things online. There are so many ways to be tagged, that you can't JUST tag Facebook. We are giving up more and more information online and not thinking twice about it. Yo?u just have to not be gullible when someone does call. Personally, I do not answer any phone number that does not have a name to it. Also ... how many times does the IRS or your bank have to say that they will never call you and ask for your private information? Here's guidelines for the IRS, and banks are probably the same:

To avoid becoming a victim of these scams, it’s important for taxpayers to know the following:

· If you owe taxes, the IRS will first contact you by mail, not by telephone.

· The IRS never asks for credit card, debit card, or prepaid card information over the phone.

· The IRS never insists that you must pay your taxes using a specific payment method.

· The IRS never demands immediate payment over the phone and does not take enforcement action directly after a phone conversation. Taxpayers are usually given prior notice of IRS enforcement action regarding tax liens or tax levies.


charlesmartel0 54M  
63 posts
12/6/2018 7:29 am

I's not just the book of face, that's just a way a lot of people package up a lot of information into a nice identity theft starter kit. Some years back, before facebook became prominent, I did some pretty heavy duty identity theft exercises, not with any bad intention, just an engineering/educational exercise. I just wanted to understand the technologies behind these things, and how easy it would be to exploit them. I destroyed all the information I had collected.

It was easy, of course, to get name, address, phone number, but then I could pick up social security numbers, credit card numbers, names of children and relatives. It really woke me up back then, and I know a lot about what to say and not say, when and where. I try to stay current with the technology and procedures. Social engineering (calling people and getting them to tell you things) has gone to shit with Indians and their heavy accents, but some people are just relentlessly stupid.

I enjoy the calls from "Microsoft" service claiming I'm having a problem they need to fix on my computer. The only "problem" from their perspective is I run a Linux distro and have exactly no Microsoft software running. I've seen videos where they'll call someone with some hacking cred, who allows the connection, then turns it around and totally gronks the scammer's box. Yelling and bad words ensue.


maidofmilkxxx 68F  
50 posts
12/6/2018 4:29 pm

I was having someone look at my computer because the last microsoft update screwed up my computer, and many other people's. I had the airplane mode on but it was grayed out and I couldn't change it. Therefore you can't get on the internet. While there (didn't want to pay $200 for him to try to fix it) a woman came in who had an appt. and she was saying how she had been hacked by someone who said he would fix her computer remotely after one of those big red signs everyone was getting, came on. I just rebooted, but she gave him access to her whole computer. Whew!!! People hear not to do that, but they do it anyway. LOL


Gowron 64M
795 posts
12/7/2018 4:37 am

A network's value depends on the number of people on it.
Depends on how important those people are to you.
If all your relatives and friends are on FB, then you'll keep logging in to hear from them.

Eventually, people will move on to a better FB ... and they'll keep doing stupid things and getting scammed.


CawintShard 57M
578 posts
12/11/2018 8:31 am

Never give out information. Never answer the phone. Max out your ability to leave a voice message. Have a backup plan. Never let them see you bleed. I gave my phone number out once to someone I thought was a friend on here. She in tern gave out my number to a bunch of subs who definitely were in need of psychiatric help. Talk about a dirty snowball. They all spun stories. They created a web and that even Charlot could not emerge from. They had a single vision: create chaos. They revel in it.


CawintShard 57M
578 posts
12/11/2018 9:35 pm

    Quoting maidofmilkxxx:
    I've been on Facebook for years and never got this scam. However ... I know many people have who have never been on Facebook, like the very elderly, and had this one. It's just like the one with the IRS calling you. Maybe your phone numbers get out there when you order things online. There are so many ways to be tagged, that you can't JUST tag Facebook. We are giving up more and more information online and not thinking twice about it. Yo?u just have to not be gullible when someone does call. Personally, I do not answer any phone number that does not have a name to it. Also ... how many times does the IRS or your bank have to say that they will never call you and ask for your private information? Here's guidelines for the IRS, and banks are probably the same:

    To avoid becoming a victim of these scams, it’s important for taxpayers to know the following:

    · If you owe taxes, the IRS will first contact you by mail, not by telephone.

    · The IRS never asks for credit card, debit card, or prepaid card information over the phone.

    · The IRS never insists that you must pay your taxes using a specific payment method.

    · The IRS never demands immediate payment over the phone and does not take enforcement action directly after a phone conversation. Taxpayers are usually given prior notice of IRS enforcement action regarding tax liens or tax levies.
Facebook has gotten too political and downright mean spirited.



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